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Posts Tagged ‘ireland’

DONAL O’SIODHACHAIN

DONAL O’SIODHACHAIN

 

The late Donal o’Siodhacháin was a regular white house guest and Open Mic contributor at the White House Pub poetry sessions up to the time of his untimely death in late October 2012*.

Born, and reared, in the heart of Sliabh Luachra, it is no surprise that poetry and history have been driving forces in his life. Ever true to the fountain of his roots, ‘In Celtic lore, it was believed the strongest memory in the mind was the last left at the moment of death and so became the first reality experienced after the cross-over into the spirit world to begin a new life’. (Quote)

 

http://www.whitehousepoets.com/the-open-poet/donal-osiodhachain.html

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Barney Sheehan RIP April 2018

Bernard ‘Barney’ Luttrell O’Callaghan Sheehan, poet, amateur jockey, leather craftsman, founder/MC and long-time driving force behind the popular weekly (Wednesday) poetry revival sessions in Limerick City at the White House bar on O’Connell Street. Photo shows Barney with a celebratory cake made to mark the occasion of the 500th weekly readings. Beginning with the 501st evening of the sessions, poet Tom McCarthy took over the role as MC. The guest poet was Brian Blaney.  SEPTEMBER 30, 2012

 

http://www.whitehousepoets.com/the-open-poet/bernard-barney-sheehan.html

Dr. Jimmy Sheehan

From Legatus: April 2013

http://legatus.org/jimmy-sheehans-mission-to-heal/

“This is a story of patients and a doctor’s care, of suffering, patience and perseverance, of a man with a passion — and a bit of impatience.

All of those qualities have driven 74-year-old Dr. Jimmy Sheehan throughout his stellar career. With his wife Rosemary’s help, Sheehan has accomplished much: an impressive career as an orthopedic surgeon in his native Ireland, the design of a world-renowned knee replacement system that bears his name, and the establishment of private hospitals.”

Cahirguillamore

From “Listowel Connection”

http://listowelconnection.blogspot.ie/2017/12/a-tan-song-listowel-convent-now-and.html

14th January 1950

(By AN MANGAIRE SUGACH)

“Cahirguillamore” is a song in which we learn of a terrible happening near Bruff on St. Stephen’s Night, 1920. An I.R.A. dance was in progress in Lord Guillaghmore’s unoccupied mansion when the place was surrounded by British forces in great strength. In the ensuing fight five I.R.A. men lost their lives. They were: Daniel Sheehan, the sentry who raised the alarm, Martin Conway, Eamon Molony, John Quinlan and Henry Wade. Here is a song that commemorates the tragedy. It was sent to me by Peter Kerins, Caherelly, Grange.  I have not learned the author’s name.

CAHIRGUILLAMORE

O Roisin Dubh your sorrows grew

On a cold and stormy night,

When Caher’s woods and glens so bold

Shone in the pale moonlight.

Within your walls where alien balls,

Were held in days of yore,

Stood many an Irish lad and lass,

At Cahirguillamore.

Did you not hear with fallen tear

The tread of silent men?

As a shot rang out from a rifle bright,

To warn those within.

The sentry brave the alarm gave,

Though he lay in his own gore:

His life he gave his friends to save,

That night at `Guillamore’.

I need not tell what there befell,

All in that crowded hall;

The Black and Tans worked quite well,

With rifle-butt and ball.

 Unarmed men lay dying and dead ,

Their life’s blood did out pour;

They sleep now in their hollow graves,

Near Cahirguillamore.

The commander of those legions

Would more suit a foreign field,

Where he would meet some savage foes,

His methods they would greet,

And not those laughing youths

Who were taught to love and pray,

And who received the body of Christ,



On that same Christmas Day.

Eileen Sheehan, poet, teacher

Though set for the most part in her native Kerry, Sheehan’s poetry is far more universal than provincial. Much has been made by critics of her word-craft: its earthy rhythms, its careful cadences, the evocative lyricality with which she explores the ancient and undying themes of love, family, domesticity, nature, death and myth. Yet her poetic compass frequently leads her beyond this well-trod ground, toward situations uncannily familiar or curiously surreal. Such moments are captured with consistently surprising metaphor in work that possesses a delightfully magnetic and multi-layered simplicity.

Eileen Sheehan was born in Scartaglin, in the Sliabh Luachra area of Co.Kerry in 1963, and has lived for most of her life in the nearby lake-side town of Killarney. A well-esteemed and much-loved poet, especially in her home province of Munster, Sheehan has won both the Listowel Writers’ Week Poetry Slam in 2004 and the coveted Brendan Kennelly Poetry Award in 2006. She has been published in several high-profile anthologies and has been invited to read her work at many festivals and events both in Ireland and around the world. Her first collection, Song of the Midnight Fox, was published by Doghouse Books in 2004, as was her most recent, Down the Sunlit Hall, in 2008. Both collections met with critical acclaim and a third, The Narrow Place of Souls, is forthcoming.

 

Extract from: poetryinternationalweb (18 July 2013)

http://www.poetryinternationalweb.net/pi/site/poet/item/23096/30/Eileen-Sheehan

http://www.doghousebooks.ie/doghouse/publications/publication.php?publication=midnight-fox

Maj.Patrick Sheahan – UN Peacekeeping

A lunala is a necklace made from gold

A lunala is necklace made from two golden discs. It would have been worn by Irish kings up to 4,000 years ago.

It was first discovered by Hubert Lannon in 1945. Lannon was a farmer in Coggalbeg, Co Roscommon. He was cutting turf when he found the item in a bog.

Lannon gave the lunala to Patrick Sheehan, who worked as a chemist in nearby Stroketown. Sheehan kept the necklace in the safe in his shop. In 2009, it was stolen as two burglars broke into the shop and took the safe.

The police worked closely with curators from the Irish Antiquities Division of the National Museum. They were able to find that jewellery and official documents from Sheehan’s safe had been left in a dumpster in Dublin.

With only a few hours before the rubbish was due for collection the police had to work frantically to find the dumpster. Once they found it they climbed in and waded through the rubbish to search for the ancient treasure.

They were relieved to find the necklace in time. It is considered one of the most important archaeological discoveries for several years.

Pat Wallace, director of the museum said: “There is a whole lot of conjoined freaks of good luck to make it possible.”

The lunala is now in the National Museum of Ireland.

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