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Patrick Sheehan, Cork, May 1921

http://theirishrevolution.ie/1921-247/#.WvC9o9QvyM8

Civilian Patrick Sheehan (aged 41) of 9 Lankford Row, Cork city (9 Lankford Row)

Date of incident: 15 May 1921

Sources: Death Certificate, 15 May 1921 (registered 11 June 1921); CE, 14, 16, 17, 21 May 1921; FJ, 19 May 1921; IT, 19 May 1921; CWN, 21 May 1921; Irish Bulletin 5:5 (7 June 1921); Borgonovo, 164-65 (note 122); Murphy (2010), 41.

 

Note: ‘About half past two or three o’clock’ in the early morning of Sunday, 15 May 1921, ‘a party of armed men entered the residence of Mr Patrick Sheehan at 9 Langford Row. They . . . shot him dead [and] left the house not long afterwards.’ A medical doctor found that Sheehan had been wounded ‘through the base of the heart and also through the neck’ and had died immediately. See CE, 16 May 1921.

 

There is strong evidence that members of the RIC assassinated Patrick Sheehan. The crime was believed to be a reprisal for a previous attack on the police. A police party surrounded the boarding house in which Sheehan and his wife lived, stormed into their bedroom, seized Sheehan from his bed, and shot him in the presence of his wife. They had been married for only a fortnight. See Irish Bulletin 5:5 (7 June 1921).

 

Patrick Sheehan was the fourth son of the late John Sheehan of Commons East near Bandon. See CE, 17 May 1921. In 1911 Patrick Sheehan (then aged 31) lived with his three slightly older brothers John, Joseph, and Daniel Sheehan at house 11 in Commons (Templemartin) near Bandon. His oldest brother John (a married farmer with one daughter) headed the family but shared the household with his sister and his three brothers. By occupation Patrick Sheehan and his brother Daniel were cattle dealers. Patrick Sheehan was buried in Templemartin Graveyard in May 1921.

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Cahirguillamore

From “Listowel Connection”

http://listowelconnection.blogspot.ie/2017/12/a-tan-song-listowel-convent-now-and.html

14th January 1950

(By AN MANGAIRE SUGACH)

“Cahirguillamore” is a song in which we learn of a terrible happening near Bruff on St. Stephen’s Night, 1920. An I.R.A. dance was in progress in Lord Guillaghmore’s unoccupied mansion when the place was surrounded by British forces in great strength. In the ensuing fight five I.R.A. men lost their lives. They were: Daniel Sheehan, the sentry who raised the alarm, Martin Conway, Eamon Molony, John Quinlan and Henry Wade. Here is a song that commemorates the tragedy. It was sent to me by Peter Kerins, Caherelly, Grange.  I have not learned the author’s name.

CAHIRGUILLAMORE

O Roisin Dubh your sorrows grew

On a cold and stormy night,

When Caher’s woods and glens so bold

Shone in the pale moonlight.

Within your walls where alien balls,

Were held in days of yore,

Stood many an Irish lad and lass,

At Cahirguillamore.

Did you not hear with fallen tear

The tread of silent men?

As a shot rang out from a rifle bright,

To warn those within.

The sentry brave the alarm gave,

Though he lay in his own gore:

His life he gave his friends to save,

That night at `Guillamore’.

I need not tell what there befell,

All in that crowded hall;

The Black and Tans worked quite well,

With rifle-butt and ball.

 Unarmed men lay dying and dead ,

Their life’s blood did out pour;

They sleep now in their hollow graves,

Near Cahirguillamore.

The commander of those legions

Would more suit a foreign field,

Where he would meet some savage foes,

His methods they would greet,

And not those laughing youths

Who were taught to love and pray,

And who received the body of Christ,



On that same Christmas Day.

John C Sheehan

November 15, 2015 Leave a comment

John Clark Sheehan (23 September 1915 – 21 March 1992) was an American organic chemist whose work on synthetic penicillin led to tailor-made forms of the drug. After nine years of hard work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.), he became the first to discover a practical method for synthesizing penicillin V. While achieving total synthesis, Sheehan also produced an intermediate compound, 6-aminopenicillanic acid, which turned out to be the foundation of hundreds of kinds of synthetic penicillin. Dr. Sheehan’s research on synthetic penicillin paved the way for the development of customized forms of the lifesaving antibiotic that target specificbacteria. Over the four decades he worked at M.I.T., Sheehan came to hold over 30 patents, including the invention of ampicillin, a commonly used semi-synthetic penicillin that is taken orally rather than by injection. His research covered not only penicillin, but also peptides, other antibiotics, alkaloids, and steroids.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Sheehan

Categories: sheehan, US Tags: , ,

A lunala is a necklace made from gold

A lunala is necklace made from two golden discs. It would have been worn by Irish kings up to 4,000 years ago.

It was first discovered by Hubert Lannon in 1945. Lannon was a farmer in Coggalbeg, Co Roscommon. He was cutting turf when he found the item in a bog.

Lannon gave the lunala to Patrick Sheehan, who worked as a chemist in nearby Stroketown. Sheehan kept the necklace in the safe in his shop. In 2009, it was stolen as two burglars broke into the shop and took the safe.

The police worked closely with curators from the Irish Antiquities Division of the National Museum. They were able to find that jewellery and official documents from Sheehan’s safe had been left in a dumpster in Dublin.

With only a few hours before the rubbish was due for collection the police had to work frantically to find the dumpster. Once they found it they climbed in and waded through the rubbish to search for the ancient treasure.

They were relieved to find the necklace in time. It is considered one of the most important archaeological discoveries for several years.

Pat Wallace, director of the museum said: “There is a whole lot of conjoined freaks of good luck to make it possible.”

The lunala is now in the National Museum of Ireland.

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Irish in the American Civil War

Extracts from Irish in the American Civil War

http://irishamericancivilwar.com/

Slaughter in Saunder’s Field: The 9th Massachusetts at The Wilderness

On the afternoon of 5th May 1864 Lieutenant-Colonel Patrick T. Hanley of the 9th Massachusetts Infantry stood with his men in the tangled and confusing wooded landscape that characterised the area known as ‘The Wilderness’ in Virginia. As battle raged, Hanley’s brigade commander Colonel Jacob B. Sweitzer came rushing up to confront the Irishman, loudly asked him ‘Why don’t you take your regiment in?’. Hanley retorted ‘We have been in, and just come out!’. Sweitzer informed him that he should take his men in again, at which the Lieutenant-Colonel turned to his few remaining soldiers with the instructions ‘Fall in, Ninth!’ (1)

Daniel George MacNamara compiled a list of the men of the 9th Massachusetts who were killed and mortally wounded at The Wilderness:

Company B: Private Martin Sheehan.

Donors to the Irish Relief Fund 1863

Sheehan, Michael 63rd New York $2.00 Gettysburg (M.I.A.)
Shehan, Michael 63rd New York $2.00

Reporting the Gettysburg Casualties of the 63rd New York, Irish Brigade

Headquarters, 63d Battalion, N.Y.S.V., 

Near Two Taverns, Penn.,

July 6, 1863.

To the Editors of the Irish-American:

Enclosed I send you the list of casualties of the 63d Battalion, N.Y.S. Vols., during the late engagement with the enemy near Gettysburg, Pa., July, 2d and 3d, 1863, for publication. It is as correct as can at present be ascertained, although some of the men reported missing may yet be found. 

The Battalion fought splendidly, driving the enemy from the position they had taken, and the “Irish Brigade” by their courage and bravery in the late fights, nobly sustained the honor of the land which gave them birth.

KILLED- Company A- Privates Charles Hogan, Patrick Kenny, John O’Brien. Company B- Privates William Moran, Edward Egan.

WOUNDED- Lieut. Col. R.C. Bentley, leg, slightly. Company A- Sergt. Thomas Murphy, abdomen, severely; James Crow, hand, slightly; Hugh Meehan, side, severely; Peter Walsh, side, severely. Company B- Corporal John O’Halloran, hand, severely; Privates John Graham, thigh, severely; Daniel Hickey, hip, slightly; John Hartigan, hand, slightly.

MISSING- Company A- Corporal Daniel E. Looney; Privates Timothy Manly, Patrick McGeehan, Thomas Kelley. Company B- Lieut. Dominick Connolly, Privates Michael Kelley, John Murphy, Michael Sheehan.

RECAPITULATION- Killed, 5; Wounded 10; Missing, 8- Total, 23.

Witnesses to History: A Bounty List of the 170th New York, Corcoran’s Irish Legion

John Sheehan

The 43-year-old enlisted on 11th September 1862. A Private in Company F, he was captured in action on 25th August 1864 at the Battle of Ream’s Station. John died while a Prisoner of War on 20th September 1864 at Andersonville, Georgia. A minor pension was granted based on his service following an application by Dennis Sheehan on 25th June 1866 from No. 167, Seventh Avenue, New York. John Sheehan had been married to his wife Ann (née Callaghan) in Co. Limerick by the Reverend Father Burke on 25th November 1835. Ann contracted meningitis and died at the age of 41 in Bellevue Hospital on 21st September 1863, while her husband was in the service. She was buried in Calvary Cemetery. When John died a Confederate POW the following year, it left their children orphaned. Of the couple’s six children (Joseph, Margaret, Mary, Dennis, Anne and Michael) two were minors when John died. These were Michael, born on 28th September 1856, and Anne, born on 31st July 1860. It was their elder brother Dennis, aged 22 in 1866, who took the two minors in and applied for the minor pensions in their name.

U.S. Military Pensioners in 19th Century Ireland: A Listing and Appeal

Sheehan, Jane (McClintock) Sheehan, Michael 150th Pennsylvania Infantry Widow
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Margaret Linehan nee Sheehan

Margaret Linehan

February 18 2003

Margaret P. (Sheehan) Linehan, an Irishwoman whose dream of immigrating to the United States almost ended in the icy North Atlantic when she tried to book passage on the Titanic, died Tuesday in Portland, Maine, 89 years after the ship went down. She was 110…

http://www.finbarrconnolly.com/margaretlinehan.htm#925849125

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Glen of Aherlow (song)

The song is based on the true story of a young ex-soldier from the Glen of Aherlow named Patrick Sheehan who was blinded at the Siege of Sevastopol. Sheehan was later jailed in 1857 for begging in Grafton Street, Dublin, his British army pension having expired after six months.[4]

Due to the publicity arising from this case, the British government was shamed into inquiring about Sheehan, to whom a life pension of a shilling a day was granted.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glen_of_Aherlow_(song)

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