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Archive for July, 2015

A lunala is a necklace made from gold

A lunala is necklace made from two golden discs. It would have been worn by Irish kings up to 4,000 years ago.

It was first discovered by Hubert Lannon in 1945. Lannon was a farmer in Coggalbeg, Co Roscommon. He was cutting turf when he found the item in a bog.

Lannon gave the lunala to Patrick Sheehan, who worked as a chemist in nearby Stroketown. Sheehan kept the necklace in the safe in his shop. In 2009, it was stolen as two burglars broke into the shop and took the safe.

The police worked closely with curators from the Irish Antiquities Division of the National Museum. They were able to find that jewellery and official documents from Sheehan’s safe had been left in a dumpster in Dublin.

With only a few hours before the rubbish was due for collection the police had to work frantically to find the dumpster. Once they found it they climbed in and waded through the rubbish to search for the ancient treasure.

They were relieved to find the necklace in time. It is considered one of the most important archaeological discoveries for several years.

Pat Wallace, director of the museum said: “There is a whole lot of conjoined freaks of good luck to make it possible.”

The lunala is now in the National Museum of Ireland.

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Irish in the American Civil War

Extracts from Irish in the American Civil War

http://irishamericancivilwar.com/

Slaughter in Saunder’s Field: The 9th Massachusetts at The Wilderness

On the afternoon of 5th May 1864 Lieutenant-Colonel Patrick T. Hanley of the 9th Massachusetts Infantry stood with his men in the tangled and confusing wooded landscape that characterised the area known as ‘The Wilderness’ in Virginia. As battle raged, Hanley’s brigade commander Colonel Jacob B. Sweitzer came rushing up to confront the Irishman, loudly asked him ‘Why don’t you take your regiment in?’. Hanley retorted ‘We have been in, and just come out!’. Sweitzer informed him that he should take his men in again, at which the Lieutenant-Colonel turned to his few remaining soldiers with the instructions ‘Fall in, Ninth!’ (1)

Daniel George MacNamara compiled a list of the men of the 9th Massachusetts who were killed and mortally wounded at The Wilderness:

Company B: Private Martin Sheehan.

Donors to the Irish Relief Fund 1863

Sheehan, Michael 63rd New York $2.00 Gettysburg (M.I.A.)
Shehan, Michael 63rd New York $2.00

Reporting the Gettysburg Casualties of the 63rd New York, Irish Brigade

Headquarters, 63d Battalion, N.Y.S.V., 

Near Two Taverns, Penn.,

July 6, 1863.

To the Editors of the Irish-American:

Enclosed I send you the list of casualties of the 63d Battalion, N.Y.S. Vols., during the late engagement with the enemy near Gettysburg, Pa., July, 2d and 3d, 1863, for publication. It is as correct as can at present be ascertained, although some of the men reported missing may yet be found. 

The Battalion fought splendidly, driving the enemy from the position they had taken, and the “Irish Brigade” by their courage and bravery in the late fights, nobly sustained the honor of the land which gave them birth.

KILLED- Company A- Privates Charles Hogan, Patrick Kenny, John O’Brien. Company B- Privates William Moran, Edward Egan.

WOUNDED- Lieut. Col. R.C. Bentley, leg, slightly. Company A- Sergt. Thomas Murphy, abdomen, severely; James Crow, hand, slightly; Hugh Meehan, side, severely; Peter Walsh, side, severely. Company B- Corporal John O’Halloran, hand, severely; Privates John Graham, thigh, severely; Daniel Hickey, hip, slightly; John Hartigan, hand, slightly.

MISSING- Company A- Corporal Daniel E. Looney; Privates Timothy Manly, Patrick McGeehan, Thomas Kelley. Company B- Lieut. Dominick Connolly, Privates Michael Kelley, John Murphy, Michael Sheehan.

RECAPITULATION- Killed, 5; Wounded 10; Missing, 8- Total, 23.

Witnesses to History: A Bounty List of the 170th New York, Corcoran’s Irish Legion

John Sheehan

The 43-year-old enlisted on 11th September 1862. A Private in Company F, he was captured in action on 25th August 1864 at the Battle of Ream’s Station. John died while a Prisoner of War on 20th September 1864 at Andersonville, Georgia. A minor pension was granted based on his service following an application by Dennis Sheehan on 25th June 1866 from No. 167, Seventh Avenue, New York. John Sheehan had been married to his wife Ann (née Callaghan) in Co. Limerick by the Reverend Father Burke on 25th November 1835. Ann contracted meningitis and died at the age of 41 in Bellevue Hospital on 21st September 1863, while her husband was in the service. She was buried in Calvary Cemetery. When John died a Confederate POW the following year, it left their children orphaned. Of the couple’s six children (Joseph, Margaret, Mary, Dennis, Anne and Michael) two were minors when John died. These were Michael, born on 28th September 1856, and Anne, born on 31st July 1860. It was their elder brother Dennis, aged 22 in 1866, who took the two minors in and applied for the minor pensions in their name.

U.S. Military Pensioners in 19th Century Ireland: A Listing and Appeal

Sheehan, Jane (McClintock) Sheehan, Michael 150th Pennsylvania Infantry Widow
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